A Cannon from the Civil War ship USS R.R. Cuyler in Oyster Bay

Cannon from RR Culyer

Photo Credit – ldoysterbay.com

At Derby-Hall Bandstand in Townsend Park in Oyster Bay, there are three cannons. One of them situated at the foot of the stairs of Derby-Hall Bandstand is a circa 1861 Civil War trophy gun from the ship USS R.R. Cuyler.

On June 26, 1903, in front of the Town Clerk’s office on Audrey Avenue, President Theodore Roosevelt unveiled a Civil War parrot gun from the cruiser USS R.R. Culyer. It is a 30-pound Parrott rifle and weighs 3,510 lb.

The gun was originally given by the Navy to the Oyster Bay High School to be placed in front of the school. The school was then on the corner of Weeks Avenue and Anstice Street, but the Board of Education felt that the gun would be more appropriate in front of the Town Clerk’s office. The Town Board and the Navy both agreed with the change. The gun is still in Oyster Bay but now faces to the north in Townsend Park, a few yards away from the Town Clerk’s office.

Roosevelt’s participation in the ceremonies had been very hastily arranged at the last minute to coincide with his planned arrival in Oyster Bay, and the President was reported to have made only the briefest of remarks before he left with Mrs. Roosevelt for Sagamore Hill.

The Cuyler was a 1202-ton screw sail cruiser and had been launched in 1861 in anticipation of the upcoming hostilities. She carried several guns of the type represented here in Oyster Bay, and she was among the fastest ships in the navy.

At the outbreak of the war, the Confederate Army was planning the capture of the Naval Academy at Annapolis and one of the treasured relics of the Navy, the USS Constitution. Admiral Robley Evans, who was the commander of the Atlantic Fleet at the time Roosevelt dedicated the gun, was then a young cadet at the Naval Academy in 1861. Evans recalled in later years how federal troops from the 1st Rhode Island, the 8th Massachusetts and the 7th New York were brought in to defend the Academy from the attacks by the Confederate from Baltimore. The Commandant of Midshipmen, Christopher Raymond Rodgers suggested to the War Department that the academy be moved along with the treasured “Old Ironsides”. Robley Evans and several other midshipmen climbed into small boats and made their way to the Constitution to begin the journey. The Constitution was towed all the way from Annapolis to Newport, Rhode Island by the Cuyler. The Constitution and the Naval Academy remained at Newport for the duration of the conflict.

Source: Oyster Bay Remembered by John E. Hammond

Early History of an Unspoiled Island Sheltered by Islands

Shelter Island Image

Shelter Island is a town and an island in Suffolk County at the eastern end of Long Island, NY between the North Fork and the South Fork. Shelter Island is around 8,000 acres. Vast tracts , nearly one-third of the island, are protected wetlands, a nature preserve marshland. In 1980, The Nature Conservancy purchased the Mashomack Peninsula’s 2039 acres as open space to be preserved in a wild state. The Mashomack Preserve, as it is called now, has four nature and bird-watching trails. Shelter Island has great beaches, golf courses, marinas and homes ranging from modest cottages to the grandest of mansions. There is a renovated manor house, scene of social events in the summer, and a variety of environmental programs for adults and children.

At the time of European encounter, it was occupied by the Manhanset tribe, an Algonquian-speaking people related to the Pequot and other Algonquians of New England. The original name of the island, used by the Manhanset Indians, is Manhansack-aha-quash-awamock, which literally translates to “Island sheltered by islands.”

Its recorded history dates back to the 17th century and the Caribbean sugar trade. Shelter Island was included in the original Plymouth Company land grant made by James I of England in 1620. On April 22, 1636, Charles I of England who was told that the colony had not made any settlements yet on Long Island, gave the island to William Alexander, 1st Earl of Stirling. The grant gave Alexander all of Long Island and adjacent islands. Alexander gave James Farret power to act as his agent and attorney in colonizing Long Island. In reward Farret was allowed to choose 12,000 acres for his personal use. Farret chose Shelter Island and Robin’s Island for his use. Farret in turn sold the islands to Stephen Goodyear, one of the founders of the New Haven Colony.

In 1651 Goodyear sold the island to a group of Barbados sugar merchants for 1,600 pounds of sugar. Nathaniel Sylvester (1610–1680), one of the merchants, was the island’s first white settler. He was among a number of English merchants who had lived and worked in Rotterdam (where he was born) before going to Barbados. On March 23, 1652, he made the purchase official by signing an agreement with Youghco (called Pogatticut), the sachem of the Manhanset tribe.

Nathaniel Sylvester, a young sugar merchant, married 16-year old Grissell Brinley in England in 1652 and sailed for America. Their marriage would start with a shipwreck off Connecticut on their honeymoon trip, where they stopped first before heading to Barbados to visit family there, then headed for Newport, R.I. to prepare for their move to Shelter Island.

After their arrival on the island in March 1652, Sylvester constructed a house for his bride, Grissell Brinley from London. The Sylvester estate was developed as a large provisioning plantation. It raised food crops, as well as livestock for slaughter, sending casks of preserved meats and other supplies to Barbados. They used the island’s white oak to make sugar barrels used in trade with Barbados. Labor was provided by a multicultural force of American Indians, enslaved Africans and English indentured servants. Sylvester and his associates were part of the Triangle Trade between the American colonies (including the Caribbean), Africa and England. His descendants continued to use slaves on the plantation into the 19th century. An estimated 200 blacks are buried at the Negro Burying Ground on the North Peninsula.

Nathaniel’s brother Constant, and two other sugar merchants, Thomas Middleton and Thomas Rouse, were co-founders but didn’t live on the island, and in 1673 Nathaniel became the sole owner. He also claimed ownership of Fishers Island and other parts of Long Island. By that time, the Manhansett tribe had declined in number and power.

As early eastern Suffolk pioneers, the Sylvesters prospered on their remote island, had 11 children, and gave shelter to many persecuted New England Quakers at a time when it was dangerous to do so. Their brave defense of religious freedom won the reverence of later generations in this country and in Great Britain.

Sylvester died in 1680, leaving the island equally to his five sons. In 1695 the family sold one-quarter of the island to William Nicoll, who controlled 90,000 acres of Islip via royal patent. Five years later, in 1700, 1000 acres of the 8,000-acre island were sold to George Havens of Newport, whose family was to become deeply entwined in the government and civic affairs of the island for more than two centuries.

Sylvester Manor stands today, just off New York State Route 114, and is controlled by Sylvester descendants. Over time these estates and parcels were split and divided by marriage and purchase. All but about 24 acres of the original thousands of acres have gone into other hands. The house that Nathaniel Sylvester built in 1652 was torn down and replaced a few feet away in 1733 by a Sylvester grandson who built a more elaborate manor house.

By the early 18th century, 20 farm families lived on Shelter Island. The Town of Shelter Island was established in 1730 by order of the Provincial Government. William Nicoll II was the first supervisor.

The community developed from there.

 

Sources:

Newsday Home Town Long Island

New York Times

 

 

 

Knollwood: The Estate and Its Owners

 

Knollwood 1

Knollwood with Garden Facade

“Knollwood”, one of architects ‘Hiss & Weekes’ most beautiful country-house commissions, was owned by a number of interesting personalities. It was built between 1906 and 1910 for Charles I. Hudson, a New York City stockbroker of the Gilded Age, at Muttontown on Long Island’s North Shore. The 60-room mansion had elements of Greek Revival, Italian Renaissance and Spanish styling with towering Ionic front columns with terraced garden and a dairy farm to satisfy his passion for raising Jersey cattle.

The house was palatially scaled and elegantly faced with smooth-dressed Indiana limestone, with design details borrowed from a variety of sources, including palaces and country estates by Palladio and Vignola built for Italian princes, and royal residences erected in France during the 17th and 18th centuries.

Inside, the house contained 30 rooms with paneling imported from England and marble fireplaces brought from Italy, as well as coffered Renaissance-style ceilings, much in evidence in the first-floor reception rooms.

Knollwood 2

Knollwood’s Interior

Viewed from the north, the most striking feature of “Knollwood” was its colossal entrance portico, balustraded across the top like the main block of the house and supported by four giant Ionic columns. In most other aspects, the north and south elevations were similar. At the ends of the two-and-a-half story main block of the house were single-story wings containing Palladian-style motifs such as arched French doors flanked by lower rectangular openings. Each of the wings, in turn, opened onto a deep loggia.

Knollwood 4

View from the North with Main Entrance Portico

Viewed from the south, the houses appeared to rest on a high basement, extending forward beneath the wide terrace at the back which overlooked the formal gardens. The terrace was reached from the gardens by grand staircases.

Knollwood 3

Landscape Design by Vitale & Geiffert

The formal gardens to the south of the house incorporated historical European precedents as well, especially in the grand scale and pronounced axiality. The landscape architect was Ferrucio Vitale. Like the great country houses of the British Isles and the villas of Northern Italy, the 150-acre estate devoted a large part of its land to commercial farming and pasturing. A stuccoed combination stable and garage building included space for 12 cars and apartments for chauffeurs, grooms, and gardeners. A poultry building and a hog house were also located on the estate, as well as an additional stable that housed farm horses, wagons, and implements. Accommodations included a boarding house for farm laborers, a cottage for the farm superintendent, and an additional cottage for agricultural workers. The presence in this farming complex of a large dairy barn for 140 head of cattle was not surprising in view of the fact that Charles Hudson took a lifelong interest in the breeding of fine Jersey cattle. A white-shingled guest cottage on the estate, designed in the Colonial Revival style, came with its own garage and stables.

Charles I. Hudson was successful and well-respected. He was elected to two terms as governor of the New York Stock Exchange. His tenure as head of C.I. Hudson & Company was not without its difficulties; the company was once sued by the brother of John D. Rockefeller and Hudson himself had his exchange seat suspended for a month following the assault of an exchange telephone operator.

Following Hudson’s death in 1921, Knollwood was sold to Gustavia Senff, widow of Charles H. Senff, director of the American Sugar Refining Company (later Domino Sugar). Mrs. Senff continued the philanthropy of her late husband, donating land in Connecticut’s Litchfield Hills for Mount Tom State Park and erecting Senff Gate at the University of Virginia (she was a native Virginian).

Charles Senff McVeigh, an attorney and co-founder of the New York law firm of Morris and McVeigh, inherited Knollwood as trustee following the death of his aunt in 1927. Besides his law practice and philanthropic causes, McVeigh was an avid sportsman. He helped to establish the American Wildlife Institute which, in part, aired radio programs about land and wildlife conservation. McVeigh sold Knollwood to King Gustav S. Zog of Albania in 1951 for approximately $102.800.

Zog bought the estate to establish a kingdom-in-exile for himself, his family and 120 members of his royal entourage staffed by Albanian subjects. But the fact is that Zog never set foot on the estate and caused disdain among his Long Island neighbors by refusing to pay property taxes. Legend has it that the king bought the estate for a “bucket of diamonds and rubies” and Zog’s riches were hidden in the mansion. Vandals ravaged walls in the mansion searching for gems hidden by King Zog. The mansion fell into total ruin.

The estate’s final owner, Lansdell Christie, had a hand in many enterprises before World War II. Christie attended West Point and began his own marine transportation business. As a transportation office in North Africa during the war, he learned about extensive iron ore deposits in Liberia. Following the war, he made a fortune mining iron ore by securing concessions to mine ore in the region, seeing to it that Liberia benefited from the development as well. Progressive in terms of racial views, he befriended Liberia’s president William Tubman and helped to found the Afro-American Institute. Christie was also involved in Democratic politics. He was the largest single Democratic donor for the 1956 Stevenson campaign and a friend of Eleanor Roosevelt.

By the time Lansdell Christie purchased Knollwood in 1955 from Zog’s parliament, the estate had suffered from years of neglect and vandalism. The terraced gardens were overgrown; the farm buildings were in disrepair. The local county works department of Oyster Bay pulled down the ruins of the home in 1959 for safety reasons. A garden pavillon remained for many years, progressively vandalized, until it was razed to its foundation, also for safety reasons. The most visible remains at the present time are the remnants of a double staircase to the old formal gardens, where traces of landscaping remain; some walkways disappearing under fallen litter and leaves, some columns, and the gate structure at the old entrance to the grounds. Seeing these remnants of this once magnificent mansions will certainly pique a hiker’s interest in the people who once lived there.

King Gustav S. Zog of the Albanians gets way too much credit and press for having owned the Knollwood Estate, the ruins of which are now part of the Muttontown Preserve in East Norwich with the gated entrance located on Jericho-Oyster Bay Road on Route 106.

All photos are from L.I. Country Houses and Their Architects, 1860-1940.

 

References:

Newsday Home Town

Wikipedia

The Freeholder, quarterly newsletter of the Oyster Bay Historical Society, Winter 2009

Long Island Country Houses and their Architects, 1860-1940

 

 

Camp Upton at Yaphank, NY

 

camp upton

During the hectic months after America’s entry into World War I in the spring of 1917, the government started construction of an Army installation in Suffolk country near Yaphank on a tract now housing the Brookhaven National Laboratory. There, on more than 10,000 acres of flat, swampy, mosquito-laden land, as many as 15,000 skilled workers and laborers struggled through the hot, wet summer to build barracks for 37,000 soldiers, mostly draftees.

Camp Upton was named after a Civil War Union general named Emory Upton. It was a marvel of logistics and supervision since almost all the workmen had to be fed and housed on the isolated site. Special railroad sidings were laid to facilitate the shipment of lumber and other materials, and a large number of private detectives had to be hired to cope with the influx of crooks who swarmed over the camp. Criminality was so rampant that a U.S. District Court was established at the base while it was being built and it tried more than 1,000 cases in about two months.

Troops began arriving little more than two months after construction started, and by the end of the following month, 30,000 men were being trained at Camp Upton. Among them were members of the 77th Infantry Division, which, composed largely of Long Islanders and New Yorkers who were soon to fight valiantly in the crucial Argonne Forest Battle in France. My father-in-law, Lt. Robert W. Morgan, was one of them who was sent to Meuse Argonne. During part of the war, the 82nd Division was also quartered there.

One of Upton’s more famous trainees was songwriter Irving Berlin, who put together a musical revue called Yip! Yip! Yaphank!  that entertained not only his buddies but Broadway audiences. Berlin’s experience at the camp led him to compose “Oh, How I Hate to Get Up in the Morning” which survived the war to become a popular song. The musical was turned into a 1943 movie “This Is The Army” starring Ronald Reagan.

Because of its isolation, providing social activities for the soldiers became a major problem. One solution was to let them out, and a shuttle train was run from the camp to the Long Island Rail Road’s main line so the men could spend their weekends in New York. It also enabled thousands of relatives and friends to ride in from the city and other parts of the Island for Saturday and Sunday visits.

After the war, Camp Upton was used as a demobilization center and then thousands of overseas veterans were processed there before returning to their homes. Some of the units demobilized at the camp were: the 327th Infantry Regiment, the 325th Infantry Regiment, the 27th Infantry Division’s 53rd Brigade (105th, 106th Infantry Regiments and the 105th Machine Gun Battalion), and the 101st Signal Battalion. Processed there, too, were thousands of mules that the Army had decided to dispose at auction. After being sold, they were lassoed, had their government brands removed, were herded into railroad cars, and dispatched to their new owners.

In May 1919, Camp Upton became the site of the Recruit Educational Center, an Army program that enrolled foreign-born, non-English speaking, and illiterate soldiers. Most of the Recruit Educational Center’s inductees were immigrants from Eastern and Southern Europe. In practice, the program aimed to “Americanize” these immigrants through instruction in the English language, military protocol, U.S. history, geography, citizenship, and political economy. Soldiers who graduated from the Recruit Educational Center at Camp Upton were eligible for a three-year term of military service, after which they could be naturalized as American citizens.

In 1921, everything at Camp Upton was auctioned off: barracks, stables, hospitals, warehouses, garages, engines, heating and refrigerating plants, electric substations, telegraph poles, wiring, even lavatories. Structures were moved or torn down and dismembered for parts and lumber. Many of the structures were transported to form the first large scale settlement at Cherry Grove on Fire Island. Hundreds of carloads of material were shipped around the country. Successful bidders had sixty days to remove their purchases. And then all was gone except the land which the federal government kept, designating it Upton National Forest. The place became almost as it had been. An era not only had ended, it had disappeared. But the Twenties had arrived. And Long Island was ready to roar.

 

Sources: Long Island, a Newsday Book, Wikipedia

 

The American Legion Honoring the Fallen

The Memorial Monument by Victoria Siegel

The Memorial Monument – Photo Credit: Victoria Siegel

The U.S. army never leaves its men behind. They do everything possible to bring the men and women killed in battle home even if it takes decades. They never forget.

In that spirit, Jack Mckie legion member of Post 1285 of the American Legion in Bayville suggested that the Robert Spittel Post begin to honor the men of the community who were killed in action. The first to receive such honor was 2nd Lt. William L. Davis killed on August 7, 1945.

PFC Robert H. Spittel was honored Dec. 8th at 9:00 AM at the War Memorial on Bayville Ave., Bayville. Robert H. Spittel was born April 29, 1923 and killed in action Dec. 8, 1944 on the island of Leyte in the Philippines. The Post bears his name and his father Herman Spittel was its first Commander.

The other brave soldiers to be so honored will be:

Sgt. James A. Harrington – March 28, 1968

Cpl. Frederick E. Scheidt – April 1, 1945

Capt. John R. Minutoli – April 6, 1967

Specialist 4 William R. Sanzoverino – May 7, 1968

Capt. Thomas J. Jozefowski – June 25, 1972

Warrant Officer Donald L. Deliplane – June 28, 1971.

 

“O God, teach us to honor them by ever cherishing the ideals for which they fought. Keep us steadfast in the cause of human rights and liberties, of law and order and true Americanism.” – Part of the prayer offered at each of these ceremonies by Chaplain Richard Kita.

Source: Locust Valley Leader, Dec. 12, 2018 by Victoria Siegel.

 

THE VILLAGE OF MILL NECK, NY – ONE OF THE PRICIEST PLACES IN THE U.S.

 

Old Grist Mill in Mill Neck

The name “Mill Neck” originated from the mill Henry Townsend built in 1661 with a grant from his fellow freeholders. The old saw mill at Mill Neck produced cut lumber in planks as well as turnings for balusters, columns and fence posts until few years before it was demolished in 1890.

The Village of Mill Neck, NY 11765 is located on the North Shore of Long Island in the Town of Oyster Bay. To live in Mill Neck, NY is to live in one of the most expensive addresses in the United States according to some exclusive magazine for the rich and the famous. Although I have my doubt to some extent. Forbes Magazine have listed Mill Neck as the third priciest address in the United States. Most likely because most of the wealthy homeowners are concentrated in that zip code.

I lived in Oyster Bay for 40 years and know the town and the surrounding areas very well. Mill Neck is right next to Oyster Bay and not all homes are in the million dollars price range. I know some friends who live in the area. Some are very wealthy and some are just ordinary folks.

The area that is called Mill Neck is a whole mix of areas. There are few streets very close to Oyster Bay which have a Mill Neck zip code and comparatively speaking have smaller houses on small property. Renville Ct. has a Mill Neck zip code but I will consider those as part of Oyster Bay. It is on the boundary of Oyster Bay and Mill Neck. Then there is the area called Mill Neck Estates which also have smaller lots and close to Bayville Bridge with mid-priced homes. The rest are all located in what I will call the real Mill Neck. These are the Mill Neck properties which get the most headlines as the most expensive homes in the United States having big mansions on huge properties.

Mill Neck is a lovely community with rolling hills and big properties. It overlooks Oyster Bay Harbor to the east, Mill Neck Bay to the north and Beaver Lake flows right in the middle toward the Mill Neck Bay. There is an ice skating rink near Beaver Lake. Shu Swamp Nature Preserve is close by near Francis Pond. Part of Mill Neck borders the Planting Fields Arboretum State Historic Park – a 400 acres state park. There is also a horse farm in the area.

 

Mill Neck Manor

The Mill Neck Manor (Picture above) looks like an English Castle. When my older son went to school in England, I sent him a postcard of The Mill Neck Manor. “Guess where this is? It’s here at home,” I wrote him. The Mill Neck Manor is located on a big property with a 35-room Elizabethan Manor House completed in 1927 for Mr. & Mrs. Robert Dodge. The whole manor house was imported from England and reassembled in Mill Neck brick by brick.

Mill Neck Manor by oldlongisland.com

Part of the ground of Mill Neck Manor in back of the manor house by oldlongisland.com

 

Apple Festival

The Apple Festival at Mill Neck Manor located close to the long driveway to the manor house. On the left is the Apple Festival and on the right is the parking spaces for visitors. The place is huge.

Later, it was sold to the Lutheran Friends of the Deaf in 1947 after Mr. & Mrs. Dodge passed away. It is now called the Mill Neck Manor School for the Deaf where the annual Apple Festival is held every first weekend in October. The Village Hall is located on Frost Mill Rd. near the Mill Neck Manor.

 

Humes Japanese Garden.jpg

The John P. Humes Japanese Stroll Garden is located in Mill Neck. It is probably the best kept secret in town. Very few people know it is there. It is open to the public. It used to be owned by John P. Humes, a former Ambassador to Japan who brought the idea of Japanese Garden to his Mill Neck home. Now the garden is a preservation project of the Garden Conservancy.

There used to be a railroad station in Mill Neck which catered to the wealthy residents of Mill Neck during the Gold Coast era. Long Island Railroad closed the Mill Neck train station a few years ago due to the fact that only one passenger took the train from Mill Neck station. Most residents of Mill Neck either take the train from nearby stations in Oyster Bay or Locust Valley which are so close by.

Until next time. Let’s keep exploring Long Island.

Rosalinda

What do you know about Great River?

There are so many Great Rivers but this one is Great River in Suffolk County, NY.

Great River

Great River is a hamlet in the Town of Islip in Suffolk County in Long Island. It is situated approximately 50 miles (80 km) east of New York City on the South Shore of Long Island adjoining the Great South Bay, a body of water protected from the Atlantic Ocean by one of the outer barrier islands, the Fire Island. Great River’s name derives from Connetquot, an Algonguian word for Great River. It was home to many wealthy families. For centuries, the Algonguin people inhabited Long Island. A sub-division of the Algonquins known as the Secatogue tribe occupied all of the area in what is now the town of Islip. Their principal villages were at West Islip (Secatogue), Bay Shore (Penataquit), and Oakdale (Connetquot).

Great River hamlet was formerly known as Youngsport. In the 1840s the Youngs family lived about one and a half miles south of Montauk Highway on Great River Road. Erastus Youngs and his family began building and repairing boats on the west shore of the Connetquot River near Great South Bay. With hardly anyone else around (21 houses), the place was called Youngsport for 30 years. Youngsport had one store and a freight station on the South Side Railroad of Long Island two miles north of it. The inhabitants were principally known as bay men. Alva Vanderbilt (later Alva Belmont), the Oakdale socialite suffragette, bought the Youngs’ home and gave it to Trinity Lutheran Parish of Brooklyn, which used it as a summer camp called “Seaside Camp” for city children. Youngsport Village’s name was changed to Great River in either 1870 or 1881. William Lawrence Breeze purchased 290-acre (120 ha) “Timber Point Farm” from William Nicoll in 1883.

Timber Point Country Club by golfadvisor.com

Timber Point Country Club – Photo by GolfAdvisor.com

 

During the Depression, my husband’s uncle, Henry Morgan, became president of Timber Point Country Club. The first thing he did was declaring that “There was no point for Timber Point”. People had no money and so he closed the club. Later on, it became a public country club. Henry Morgan tried to lure some big names to play golf there but since the golf course was one of the toughest golf courses in the country, they could not get the big names to come because it would affect their handicaps.

Timber Point Golf Club by Instagram

 

One particular state park in Great River is the Bayard Cutting Arboretum State Park (690 acres ) which was originally part of the former Bayard Cutting Estate of 7,500 acres with 12 outbuildings.

Bayard Cutting by Flickr

The estate of William Bayard Cutting (1850–1912) donated it as an arboretum to the State of New York by Cutting’s widow and daughter, Mrs. Olivia James, “to provide an oasis of beauty and quiet for the pleasure, rest and refreshment of those who delight in outdoor beauty; and to bring about a greater appreciation and understanding of the value and importance of informal planting.”

bayard by yelp 5

Bayard Cutting Arboretum Manor House – Photo by Yelp.com

 

Bayard Cutting Arboretum State Park consists of a notable large Tudor-style English country house called “Westbrook” and its surrounding landscaped gardens overlooking a great lawn rolling down to the Connetquot River. The house was designed by architect Charles C. Haight in 1886 for William Bayard Cutting, who was an attorney, financier, real estate developer, sugar beet refiner and philanthropist. Located in the former Cutting residence are magnificent fireplaces, woodworkings, and stained glass windows.

 

Bayard by Yelp.com

The Formal Garden – Photo by Yelp.com

Bayard by yelp.com 2

Autumn Scene – Photo by Yelp.com

An annex to the mansion was built in 1890 and contained a billiards room, a small organ, a gaming room and guest rooms. The landscape design was done by Frederick Law Olmsted, popularly considered to be the father of American landscape architecture. Olmsted was famous for co-designing many well-known urban parks with his senior partner Calvert Vaux, including Central Park and Prospect Park in New York City. In 1895 Cutting and his brother, Fulton, installed a golf course at Westbrook, which was the first private golf course in the United States.

 

References:

Hometown Long Island by Newsday and Along the Great South Bay by Harry W. Havemeyer.

 

Until next time. Let’s keep on exploring Long Island.

Rosalinda